How can the US catch up on biosimilars? – MedCity News

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Biosimilars are a growing share of the U.S. pharmaceuticals market. But while there are at least 240 biosimilars in the development pipeline, just nine have achieved FDA approval and only three have reached the market.

What needs to change for more biosimilars to enter the U.S. market?

Read the full story in MedCity News.

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Inequality in medicine – Nature

Image: Zara Picken

Regulators have been calling for equal representation of men and women in health research for nearly 25 years. So why are women still underrepresented?

Read the full story in Nature

Arkansas should halt execution spree and let its drugs expire – New Scientist

Reuters

An unprecedented scheduled execution spree has begun this week in Arkansas. The state initially aimed to carry out the death sentence on eight people in 11 days before its stockpile of one of the three drugs used for lethal injections, called midazolam, reached its expiry date of 30 April.

Last night, legal hurdles were overcome in one case and the first execution took place. Arkansas should have let the midazolam expire. In fact, it shouldn’t have used it at all.

Whatever you think of capital punishment, the drugs used for lethal injection in the US today don’t offer the certainty of a swift end, because of a horrifying combination of a lack of data, historical quirks and uninformed decision-makers.

Read the full story in New Scientist.

Take two placebos and call me in the morning – NeoLife

Illustration by Gabriel Alcala

When a new drug is being tested in a controlled clinical trial, half the patients get the real drug and half get a placebo, something harmless like a sugar pill or a saline injection. But patients on the placebo often improve anyway, and that’s because they expect that they’re getting the real drug, right? Well, no. Harvard professor Ted Kaptchuk’s research has exploded that explanation. Read the full story in NeoLife.