Dyslexia doesn’t work the way we thought it did – Mental Floss

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Dyslexia is not just about reading, or even language. It’s about something more fundamental: How much can the brain adapt to what it has just observed? People with dyslexia typically have less brain plasticity than those without dyslexia, two recent studies have found.

Read the full story in mental_floss.

Video game beta test reveals how we might act if the world ends – New Scientist

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Have you ever wondered how you would act at the end of the world? Players’ actions in a video game could reveal insights into how an impending apocalypse might affect people’s behaviour. A team of researchers analysed how players behaved in a beta test of ArcheAge, a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG).
Read the full story in New Scientist.

Power of positive thinking skews mindfulness studies – Nature

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There’s a little too much wishful thinking about mindfulness, and it is skewing how researchers report their studies of the technique.

Researchers at McGill University analysed 124 published trials of mindfulness as a mental-health treatment, and found that scientists reported positive findings 60% more often than is statistically likely. The team also examined another 21 trials that were registered with databases such as ClinicalTrials.gov; of these, 62% were unpublished 30 months after they finished. The findings hint that negative results are going unpublished.

Read the full story in Nature.

Kids want good answers to their questions

Credit: Willie Nordmann, flickr. Used under Creative Commons.

If you’ve ever been around a preschooler, you’re familiar with their incessant questions. It can be tempting to brush them off with a “Because I said so,” but new research shows that can hurt your credibility.

Five-year-olds and even three-year-olds can tell the difference between poor explanations and those that provide new information.

Read the full article in Scope.